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Excuse Me, Just Passing Through October 13, 2009

Posted by jetson in Personal.
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Are Christians just passing through their earthly life on their way to heaven?  I often wonder about this.  Before I continue, I have to say that I am referring to those Christians who seem genuinely excited to get to the promised land, heaven, and seem to take some level of comfort in the knowledge that not everyone will make it.  Yes, they are out there among us, those who take joy in the fact that only those who accept Jesus will be saved.

Many of these people spend a great deal of time reminding others of their plight, including their own children!  What a lovely thought that is – telling your own young, impressionable child that she will not make it to heaven with mommy and daddy if she does not believe in God.  Even worse, when she asks where she will end up, well, you know the rest.

An atheist does not believe in God, and believes there is only one earthly life.  They know they will not go to heaven, so they are potentially more motivated to make the best of their time on earth.  Or at the very least, they are not inclined to waste time trying to impress a god so that they can be a part of a place where some people get to live blissfully forever, while others are doomed to the fires of Hell.  I am going to burn, literally – because I want my body cremated!

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1. Justin - October 13, 2009

Religion definitely screws a lot up. I’m glad I’m not religious. One thing to point out is you said “(atheists) are not inclined to waste time trying to impress a god so that they can be a part of a place where some people get to live blissfully forever.” That isn’t the Christian message. The Christians say that there is no way people could ever be good enough to meet God’s perfect standard, so they rely on what Jesus did for them instead by faith. It is not about religion. It is about a relationship with Christ.

jetson - October 13, 2009

There are many Christian messages! One of them involves living eternally in heaven with God. And most Christians are very aware that many humans will instead suffer in Hell. Maybe it’s not the central message, I wouldn’t know since I was Catholic!

2. og - October 13, 2009

So, as an atheist you know you are not going to heaven. Have you ever considered what if you’re wrong? What are you presenting your kids? Are you leading them down a path that will have eternally damning consequences? Is that better in your mind than a Christian leading their kids to a path of salvation? We are all indoctrinated to some degree, even if you say to your kids they are free to believe as they wish, they still learn your behavior.

jetson - October 14, 2009

As an atheist, I have decided that heaven is not real. As for my kids, I teach them how to think. Their journey belongs to them, and them only. I am honest with my kids when I tell them my personal decisions, namely, I cannot be sure that I am correct. This is far better than telling them they will go to Hell if they do not accept Jesus, because Jesus (God) is only one of many possibilities. If one is a Christian, they have only one possibility, and they are usually unwilling to consider that they could be wrong.

Indoctrination is to teach uncritically. My kids are free to explore religion, and one of them is currently convinced that Revelations is true 🙂

3. Justin - October 14, 2009

What I was saying is yes, there is a Heaven and Hell – but getting to Heaven isn’t based on our good deeds. It is based on what Jesus did for us. All religions say “do this then this, then this.” Christianity says you could never do enough. Jesus did it for you.

4. sg - October 14, 2009

As for the last paragraph, that atheists are more motivated to make the most of their live, this lacks a little clarity. Since you are making the implication that all Christians are in one bucket and atheists are in another….then the implication would be served with the following ~ making the most of your live from an atheist point of view would you equate that to something that Hitler did? Does this better align with natural selection? Again, since you really don’t have to follow a moral compass passed down by a higher power it is not a requirement on or if those actions fall as being good or evil. But then good and evil should not exist in the atheists vocabulary since this is theistic definition along with sin and hell, these concepts should not be valid in the atheists realm and it shouldn’t really matter. So to what moral compass do you refer too, i guess this should fall back on the core basic principals of evolution.

Don’t know how we got here, don’t know why we have feelings, we are just here and anything that we do is not considered good or evil.

Because good and evil are social norms founded on theistic principals.

So basically, your good or moral compass would have to be based on Darwin, survival of the strong and natural selection to boot.

taking this a bit further into spirituality, well why even bother, spiritual with who? yourself?

in the atheistic realm, then you are your own god, all judgment is righteous according to you, no one is ever better just the same as you. No actions that you do are evil or good since their is no higher power that you are accountable too. I guess if you mess up, by taking a life, there is nothing that can ever redeem you. Example, how can you forgive yourself for falling asleep at the wheel that ended up in the death of your wife or child, are you cursed to earthly damnation and hatred to yourself? Who’s example would you follow, it would have to be left up to you as an atheists to cope. What if you caused the death of several people accidentally, how would you make the most of it?

What is grace in the atheists vocabulary, isn’t this a theistic definition?

jetson - October 15, 2009

Actually, I said they are “potentially” more motivated to make the best of their time on earth. And I am asking a question, as opposed to making an assertion regarding all Christians. If you read carefully, you will notice that I defined a specific group of Christians as quoted below:

Before I continue, I have to say that I am referring to those Christians who seem genuinely excited to get to the promised land, heaven, and seem to take some level of comfort in the knowledge that not everyone will make it.


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